Tag Archives: ethiopia

The Power of One: A Legacy in Action

It’s not every day that a small nonprofit—even one that’s been around as long as Children Incorporated—finds out that they’re receiving a donation of $1.75 million.

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Thousands of children will benefit from Mr. Foy’s donation.

I suppose that’s why I remember the day so well. We had been saddened in 2015 to hear of the death of Mr. Glenn Foy, an engineering innovator and adventurous spirit who had passed away at such a young age — just  59 years old — in a private plane accident. I had spoken to him only once, a few months before his death, and remembered him as a kind soul, committed to what we do, and a regular sponsor over the last decade. It wasn’t unusual for Children Incorporated to receive a bequest, although most tend to come from sponsors who have a much longer history with our organization.

Mr. Foy’s law firm informed us that we’d be receiving 28 percent of his estate to help children however we saw fit, which certainly made my eyes widen. It seemed like a large percentage for such a relatively recent donor.

The magnitude of Mr. Foy’s generosity has allowed us to go to new places, accomplish much, and impact the lives of not just children in need, but their families, their communities, and in some cases, generations to come.

But on the day we learned how that 28 percent translated into real dollars — 1.75 million of them to be exact— I was struck truly speechless.

Glenn Foy was an adventure-seeker, a cycling enthusiast, an aviator, a lover of life. His annual contributions impacted the lives of eight children over several years, but he was quietly generous, preferring not to receive attention for his philanthropy. His supportive family, I hope, will indulge me the attention I want to give to him now.

The magnitude of Mr. Foy’s generosity has allowed us to go to new places, accomplish much, and impact the lives of not just children in need, but also their families, their communities, and in some cases, generations to come.

Our Hope In Action Fund is, essentially, money set aside to use in tackling an ever-growing list of programs to support, centers to build or improve, and projects to get off the ground. We chip away at it, sometimes even making great strides; but this year, we turned so much of that hope into impactful, measurable action.

Glenn Foy’s Legacy in Action

Pinagpala Center, Philippines

Because of Mr. Foy’s gift, we were able to construct a two-classroom daycare center in Tagaytay City, Philippines. Mothers in this struggling area now have a safe place to leave their children as they seek employment or go to work. Every day, you can find children learning and playing at Pinagpala Center, which also provides a nourishing feeding program to improve the health of each child.

Marching Band and Classrooms at Juan Apostol, Guatemala

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Children in Guatemala will benefit from new musical instruments.

School and community leaders in Guatemala City have come up with a unique way to encourage student participation in school—the Juan Apostol Marching Band. This band’s talents have become known throughout the country, and playing in the band has become the goal for so many students, which, in turn, encourages students to apply themselves academically (you have to show an “A” grade average before you are eligible to participate; Mr. Foy’s gift allowed us to purchase instruments for the band). At the same school, we also built two new classrooms.

Fruit and Vegetable Garden Program, Ethiopia

Multiple generations will benefit from the produce-bearing garden at Kids Hope–Ethiopia. The community surrounding the center is desperate for agricultural knowledge and supplies. Not only will this garden provide food for the children who attend Kids Hope, but it will also serve as a learning experience for the community.

Biofuel Plant, Kenya

This year, we were able to build a biofuel plant at Maria Immaculata school in Nairobi. Biofuel means energy taken from burning the gases emitted from organic matter – in this case, cow manure. It sounds unpalatable, but these enterprising Sisters figured out a way to keep their costs lowered and introduce more sustainable solutions. And we were there to help.

Dandora Medical Clinic, Kenya

The Dandora Community Center holds a special place in our hearts, and renovating their medical clinic helped the center make huge gains in Nairobi. Attendance is booming, which means healthier children and healthier families. Healthy kids spend more time in school, which leads to better-educated generations, which leads to a brighter future for the whole community.

Water Purification Plant, Kenya

At St. Nicholas School in Msamaria, Mr. Foy’s gift allowed us to move forward with plans to repair a water purification plant. The school’s commitment to self-sustainability keeps costs low while teaching children valuable life skills.

Student Attendance Program, Kentucky

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Students in Kentucky will benefit from Mr. Foy’s donation.

At Martha Jane Potter Elementary School, one volunteer coordinator hit upon an idea for a motivational program that would help encourage attendance. Until that point, attendance had been sporadic at best, particularly during standardized testing. We funded the program, the experiment worked, and we expect the school to try it again next year.

College/Career Awareness Program, Kentucky

Rural Kentucky has a tough time in their struggle with poverty, and we find a lot of the same problems in our country’s rural poor areas as we do abroad. Children without resources, struggling their best to survive, when just orienting them towards other futures often makes a lasting impact. We helped a coordinator at Carr Creek Elementary School establish a program that exposes children to various careers, takes them on tours of community colleges, and even helps their parents with career readiness.

After-School Program, New Orleans

The Encore Academy wanted a way to increase its students’ academic success and social and emotional well-being, and they found it through homework assistance and enrichment activities including computer coding and expressive writing. We proudly funded this program, which also includes gifts of clothing-and now thirty participants are benefiting from it. Gifts of books for the school library extend the program’s impact to the entire student body.

Disaster Relief, Baton Rouge

We’d planned to work on a project at Friendship Capitol Academy, but when the floods struck this summer, we shifted our focus to disaster relief. Approximately forty children in grades nine through twelve received practical assistance (clothing, food, cleaning supplies, and hygiene items), as well as support, comfort, and motivation to attend school, despite the upheaval of the world that surrounds them.

Kindergarten “Boys Club,” Washington, D.C.

At Lucy Ellen Moten School, a coordinator noticed that kindergarten-aged boys were having trouble adjusting to the routine and the structure of a school day. What’s more, they tended to take their overwhelming feelings out by pushing, hitting, or biting. Early intervention was identified as the key to helping these boys express themselves more healthily.

Making your Own Legacy

Glenn Foy had never seen our Hope In Action Fund list, yet he chose to leave such a substantial amount to an organization he believed in. Why? How could he have known what an impact his gift would make?

We may never know the answer, but I’d guess that it’s because Mr. Foy witnessed the power of much smaller sums. And I’d guess this because I hear it from our sponsors all the time. They love how connected they feel with their sponsored children, and they know they can trust us to address specific and individualized needs for each and every child. It’s that relationship that keeps our donors engaged for lifetimes (there really is a rather extraordinary number of sponsors who have been with us since Children Incorporated began in 1964!).

They love how connected they feel with a child, and they know they can trust us to address specific and individualized needs for that child.

This year, we’ve launched our On the Road series to show the impact of your contributions to the lives of the children we serve around the world. The dispatches are often inspiring; other times, they convey the honest exhaustion and discouragement that come from the burden of poverty. But time and time again, they always find hope.

In this season of gratitude, we urge you to take a few minutes to think about your legacy. Do you have a plan to make what you’ve earned throughout your life count long after you’re gone?

Whether you make arrangements to have the children you sponsor supported until adulthood or whether you’re more interested in donating a lump sum to support our chosen programs the way Glenn Foy did—no gesture goes unnoticed and no effort goes unused.

We approach each new year with hope. In 2016, we were able to turn an unprecedented amount of hope into action. One man’s decision made that possible for children in so many countries around the world. At every level, we’re counting on the continuing generosity of all of our sponsors and donors to keep that momentum going in the years ahead.

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HOW DO I SPONSOR A CHILD THROUGH CHILDREN INCORPORATED?

You can sponsor a child with Children Incorporated in one of three ways – call our office at 1-800-538-5381 and speak with one of our staff members, email us at sponsorship@children-inc.org, or go online to our donation portal, create an account, and search for a child that is available for sponsorship.

SPONSOR A CHILD

Letters from Abel

Let’s get right to it: We would be nowhere without your support. Sponsors make it possible for Children Incorporated to help hundreds of thousands of children around the globe rise above poverty.

Kids like Abel, the tenth grader that I and Luis Bourdet visited last June in Ethiopia, depend on sponsors for supplies and flourish because they know someone out there cares about them. Abel is in the top five of his class!

Sabrina holding a picture of Abel

We contacted Abel’s longtime sponsor, Sabrina Timperman, about her connection to Children Incorporated and her relationship with this rising star. Timperman is a veterinarian and lives in Manhasset, NY.

Q and A with Children Incorporated

CI: Why did you get involved with Children Incorporated?

ST: When I was a little kid, I remember watching commercials on Saturday mornings about sponsoring a child. I’d always tell my mom I really wanted to sponsor a child, but we never did. Still, the commercials stuck with me. I decided as soon as I was able, I would do it- and I did. I signed up in 2007 when Abel was very young. I always wanted children but never had any myself. Instead, I saw an opportunity to help a child in need.

CI: Did you specify specific characteristics of the child you wanted to sponsor (age, gender, country) or was Abel assigned to you without specifications?

ST: I was assigned Abel at random. I searched online for Children Incorporated and signed right up. I’ve never looked back.

I searched online for Children Incorporated and signed right up. I’ve never looked back.

CI: It’s been almost ten years-what have you learned about Abel?

ST: Abel is 16 and in the tenth grade. He loves math and wants to be an engineer someday. He’s very smart and could go far if given the opportunity. He lives with his sister and mother in a government-owned house in the slums that costs about $30 a month to rent. His mother supports the family by selling small, plastic housewares and dishes on the street.

CI: What do you know about the slum where Abel lives?

ST: Someone in his family is sick, and I know that some of the things that I send are making a big difference. I hope it helps him survive in a world that is very harsh. They don’t have a lot.  The money is providing him with food, clothes, books, and school.

CI: Do you communicate with him directly?

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Abel’s school photo as a young boy

ST: Yes! He writes letters to me in English. His letters are short, but I cherish them. Abel tells me which sports he likes, like basketball. He has a sister; someone in his family is sick but not sure whom. I’ve always wished we’d had been able to contact each other more.  I know he goes to school and studies hard.

CI: What do you wish for Abel?

ST: I have this vision that in 30 years from now when he is an adult, one time before I die, I would love to see him. It is so interesting to be with someone for so long having never met them. I’ve watched him grow up. I have his pictures in my room of him getting bigger and bigger. I hope I have given him a chance at a better life.

CI: What advice would you have for someone who is reading about you and Abel, and is considering sponsorship?

ST: I think that it is extremely rewarding; it is money well spent. I could go buy myself a latte, but this small amount of money is changing someone’s life, and it is the difference between that child eating or not- and we all have to do our part in making others lives better and this is a meaningful way to do that. You walk away going, “I changed someone’s life today, and I helped give them something that they wouldn’t be able to get in another way”. The money is helping to make a difference and that is important even if you don’t ever meet the child. It’s a little money for all of us, but if we put it together, then we can be impactful and make a really big difference. And hopefully, they can be sustainable and more self-sufficient in a way and they can continue to succeed and move forward.

Meet Abel

“Hi, my name is Abel. I am in the tenth grade. My favorite subject in school is physics. My teacher describes me as active, sociable, and an excellent student. I enjoy reading and playing soccer. I live with my mother and sister. I live in a small, old rented room that has no running water or indoor plumbing. When I grow up I want to be an engineer. Sponsorship is important to me because it helps with my school fees and other expenses so that I can attend school regularly without a problem.”

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HOW DO I SPONSOR A CHILD IN ETHIOPIA?

You can sponsor a child in Ethiopia in one of three ways – call our office and speak with one of our sponsorship specialists at 1-800-538-5381, email us at sponsorship@children-inc.org, or go online to our donation portal, create an account, and search for a child in Ethiopia that is available for sponsorship.

SPONSOR A CHILD

 

In the Spirit of Thanksgiving

In the eight months since we first launched our On the Road series, Luis and I have traveled some 20,000 miles around the globe visiting the families and communities your contributions support.      

In the spirit of Thanksgiving, we thought we’d share some of our favorite food samplings from around the world.

We are so grateful for the opportunity to report on the impact sponsorship has on the children we serve. We’ve met some pretty amazing people along the way, many of whom have welcomed us into their homes to break bread.

In the spirit of Thanksgiving, we thought we’d share some of our favorite food samplings from around the world.

Salteñas (Bolivia)

If you travel to Bolivia, save room for lunch! Luis and I ate so well with the Sisters while we were there that most days we skipped dinner altogether.

We got to try some of the children’s favorites: majadito (rice cooked with onions, tomatoes, and spices, and served with fried eggs and yucca or plantains), mondongo  (marinated pork, served with boiled corn and potatoes), and pique macho (cubed beef, sliced hot dogs, and stir-fried vegetables cooked in local spices and served over French-fried potatoes).

And of course, Salteñas!

A Salteña is the Bolivian version of an empanada. Filled with meat, potatoes, peas and more, this delicious pastry is a great mid-morning snack. Deliciosa!

Injera (Ethiopia)

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Ethiopian food means injera, a spongy pancake-like flatbread made from teff, wheat, barley, corn, and/or rice flour. A fundamental part of every Ethiopian meal, it is often eaten with meat stews and cooked greens. Luis and I make a habit of trying out the traditional cuisine on each of our trips — and, in Ethiopia, that included visiting a restaurant that offered traditional dancing as well as dinner.

Dishes come served on large platters to share, brimming with lentils, kale, and spicy tomato stew. The flavors are delicious, and better yet, Ethiopians use the injera to scoop up the food — no utensils required!

Tortillas (Mexico)

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Luis and I mainly ate tacos while in Mexico. The variety of fresh and flavorful ingredients is astounding. My favorite part of Mexican dishes: they all seem to come with fresh limes for extra flavor, although dishes are usually already full of flavor. Rice, beans, guacamole, and salsa are served with every meal, and tortillas are plentiful, brought to you in a round tortilla warmer that looks like an oven mitt to keep your tortillas warm as you eat your meal.

Sorghum (Kentucky)

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Driving through Kentucky, it’s easy to find mainstays like pizza, fried chicken, spaghetti, biscuits and gravy, and chicken and dumplings. Last summer, we had the opportunity to stop by a local farm with one of our volunteer coordinators and meet a farmer who makes sorghum, a sweet syrup akin to molasses. You haven’t lived until you’ve tried sorghum on your biscuits. Yum!

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HOW DO I SPONSOR A CHILD THROUGH CHILDREN INCORPORATED?

You can sponsor a child with Children Incorporated in one of three ways – call our office at 1-800-538-5381 and speak with one of our staff members, email us at sponsorship@children-inc.org, or go online to our donation portal, create an account, and search for a child that is available for sponsorship.

SPONSOR A CHILD

Bearing Fruit

When Luis Bourdet and I traveled to Africa earlier this summer, we found ourselves, as always, deeply impressed by the programs and centers we visited and the hard-working people who run them.  

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The beginning of gardening work at Kids Hope.

A five-acre compound that schools, houses, and nurtures the disadvantaged children of rural Ethiopia is supported by the child sponsorship organization, Canadian Humanitarian. In the area outside of Shashamane, life is both easier and tougher for Ethiopian children.

While they don’t suffer from the closely-packed life of the slums, with its crime, disease, and scarcity caused by overcrowding, they also live a life of isolation. It’s harder to get from one place to the other in the country, especially when roads aren’t maintained and distances between home and school are vast. The land is ripe for cultivating crops, but the people are so poor that even the basic farming supplies (even seeds!) aren’t available to them.

Skills for a lifetime

Bisrat Sime, Kids Hope’s Director, had high hopes for some of this land. The five acres on which the compound sits wasn’t being used effectively, he said, and it was perfect for a hands-on gardening program. Such an experience wouldn’t just help feed the community, it would give children the agricultural skills that would last their whole lives—perhaps even pass down to future generations.

Luis and I were struck by that idea, that the only thing separating this community from several lifetimes of positive change was simple supplies. The willingness to educate was there. The willingness to be educated was there. The environment was right. A nation was ready to feed itself.

The willingness to educate was there. The willingness to be educated was there.

Upon our return, Luis set about putting a bug in donors’ ears, and in a short time, he was able to send funds to Bisrat.

Weeks passed, and then in August, Luis received the update he’d been hoping for: the combined efforts of a tractor and oxen plow (bought with the money they’d received) had cleared the land, and training had begun.

A month later, and the project was in full swing. Bisrat sent photos of children learning how to plant a fruitful vegetable garden, with emphasis put on reaping the most benefit from the land without exhausting both natural and donated resources. Like the land, the children will bear their own fruit—a healthier life fed by nutritious food and a brighter future made possible by skills-based education.

A donation to Children Incorporated goes a lot further than just a packet of seeds or even a plow. It grows into something that can be harvested over and over, making real change in the lives of not just today’s children, but tomorrow’s as well.

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HOW DO I SPONSOR A CHILD IN ETHIOPIA?

You can sponsor a child in Ethiopia in one of three ways – call our office and speak with one of our sponsorship specialists at 1-800-538-5381, email us at sponsorship@children-inc.org, or go online to our donation portal, create an account, and search for a child in Ethiopia that is available for sponsorship.

SPONSOR A CHILD

Africa: The Impact of Compassion

When I boarded the plane to Africa, I thought I knew at least a little about what to expect. My experiences in Bolivia and Kentucky had shown me how impactful our programs could be on the lives of children in poverty, the poverty in Ethiopia and Kenya far surpassed what I ever could have imagined.

I returned knowing so much more about what children need to thrive—not just food and shelter, but education, respect, identity, and opportunity.

The Rainbow Amid the Addis Ababa Slums

I now find myself wishing there was a way to really give people at home an idea of what it’s like in some of the city slums in Ethiopia. Words and even photos only paint some of the picture — the eight-by-ten-foot homes with no windows or floor, the constant hunger, the desperation. But with that picture I’d want to show how even a small school,which so many Americans take for granted,can change the course of a child’s life.

Words and even photos only paint some of the picture—the eight-by-ten-foot homes with no windows or floor, the constant hunger, the desperation.

The Rainbow Center, one of Children Incorporated’s volunteer partners, showed me the benefits of providing an education to children like Luele and Abel. Fasika, the program’s manager, coordinates volunteers to provide not just tuition but uniforms and supplies, following it up with personal visits and support. While their parents are busy earning money to pay for their exorbitant rent, it means the world to these kids to have someone personally invested in their well-being.

Growing a future in Shashamane

Even when thinking about the burdens placed on shoulders so small, it’s hard not to smile when I remember how delighted the children of Shashamane were to see their faces on my iPad screen. Their rural lives are easier in some ways than their urban counterparts, but in others, the poverty has hit harder. Families tend to have more room to breathe out here, but transportation is difficult with less infrastructure and more land to traverse.

We spoke with Bisrat Sime, who oversees Kids Hope, about how Children Incorporated can help with the most basic need —food. Our 17 sponsored children in the program receive tuition, uniforms, supplies, and transportation to school, but the community is in desperate need of even seeds and fertilizers to help their field produce crops. I recalled the Ethiopian famine of the 1980s as I noticed just how thin everyone is in Shashamane.

A path forward for Kenyan girls

The Materi School for Girls is a living reminder of how just one person can make a tremendous impact, even after their death. Brother John Konzka founded the school in a village called Taraka to give opportunities to Kenyan girls, and now, two years after his passing, it’s easy to see the results of his tireless efforts. I think about how peaceful it seemed to watch students studying in the shade, singing songs together, knowing that these young women have so many more opportunities ahead of them than their mothers did.

I’ll never forget the joy and tenderness with which Vero, a young student, and her mother embraced after a long separation. It’s not easy for these families to live apart while their children are at school, but many of them jump at the chance to give their daughters a good education.

Learning to be self-sustaining

Perhaps the most alarming circumstances I saw were in Nairobi, but it was also where I witnessed the most hope. Msamaria is a community center for street children with a primary school that educates 268 students—a mix of boarding and day students. Being on the beautiful, lush grounds was a reminder of how these centers are quite a literal oasis for children from Nairobi’s slums.

The slums haunt me. During our home visits with our social worker, Caroline, I’d never seen so many destitute children in one place, so many of whom were orphaned or abandoned. I feel more determined than ever to help Children Incorporated grow its number of sponsored children at Msamaria.

It makes me smile to remember Naomi, the Msamaria School’s director, who is someone who works incredibly hard every single day. She’s turned the school into a self-sustaining wonder, with a successful bottled water business and a growing agricultural program.

I’m coming home with clear eyes, having seen for myself the difference that we can make, and I’m ready to get to work trying to make that difference for more and more children who need it. And so many do.

Every child I’ve met confirms Children Incorporated’s mission for me, but it’s the adults who are working so tirelessly so that these kids can have a better life—they’re the ones who keep coming to mind as I think back on my trip to Africa. They seem to have almost a superhuman ability to take a small amount of support from each of us and turn it into something bigger than the sum of its parts. The resourcefulness, the dedication, and the love that these men and women embody on a daily basis are a testament to how much we can do for future generations of Africans.

It’s tough to leave these children behind, but it’s been an invaluable trip. I’m coming home with clear eyes, having seen for myself the difference that we can make, and I’m ready to get to work trying to make that difference for more and more children who need it. And so many do.

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HOW DO I SPONSOR A CHILD IN KENYA?

You can sponsor a child in Kenya in one of three ways – call our office and speak with one of our sponsorship specialists at 1-800-538-5381, email us at sponsorship@children-inc.org, or go online to our donation portal, create an account, and search for a child in Kenya that is available for sponsorship.

SPONSOR A CHILD

Country Roads and City Slums

We’ve been in Ethiopia for just a few days and we’re already packing up for our next stop in Nairobi, Kenya. As we prepare to hit the road, I am struck by the contrasts between urban and rural poverty.

In a way, it’s not unlike America — the rural poor living in run-down trailers off dirt roads in Eastern Kentucky bear little resemblance to the urban poor in housing projects of Detroit.

When businesses move in, residents are forced out. Just outside the city, 300,000 homes are under construction, although there’s no public transportation to help them get back into the city where their jobs or schools are.

But in Ethiopia, poverty is so much deeper and the contrast is starker, more striking and obvious.

The inner-city slums

Within the city of Addis Ababa, the construction boom is a testament to the vast amounts of foreign investment helping to develop the city. Every other building seems to be under construction, and that’s causing huge problems for the urban poor.

When businesses move in, residents are forced out. Just outside the city, 300,000 homes are under construction, although there’s no public transportation to help them get back into the city where their jobs or schools are.

We saw one of these huge relocation areas on our first day here – the former emperor’s palace is surrounded by shantytowns and shacks, but the government is forcing the inhabitants out to make room for businesses and tourist ventures. The people who have been living there are being moved to housing projects away from the center of the city. They are given the option of putting a down payment on a home in the newly designated area, but they are not given assistance to move, so few can afford it. These people, already poor, now have to relocate suddenly – away from their schools and jobs. The move leaves them even poorer, and the constant uncertainty is traumatic, especially for the children.

Relocation is intended to help the middle class with new business opportunities and development, but the poor are the ones who are disproportionately affected. With families spending most of what they earn on housing, they have little left for food and usually none for school tuition.

Out in the country

The rural version of the government’s relocation program is what’s hit the poor outside of the cities. In order to improve the country’s agricultural outlook, the government has moved rural farmers off their land, which is being turned over to large agricultural companies and investors. The locals are sent to live in the city slums or in other rural regions, where the soil hasn’t been cleared, roads haven’t been built, and they aren’t supplied with seed, fertilizer or any of the tools needed to farm.

In the countryside, the relocation programs have meant the soil that families are given yields little and, everyone is too isolated to get to schools or services – even if they can afford them.

Residents here pump water from wells they’ve dug, but water is still in short supply – and clean water, even more so. Children are thin and everyone’s clothes are tattered and worn.

While uncertainty tears at the emotional well being of the urban poor, it’s the isolation that impacts the rural population the most. Even a few miles is a huge distance out here, where there are no vehicles and only the lucky have even donkeys for pulling carts.

Most travel on foot or, more often, don’t travel at all. That means they get no services, no support, and no education, except for the lucky few who have ended up at Kids Hope Ethiopia and similar alternatives.

We will be in Kenya tomorrow afternoon and we expect to see more challenges there. Half of all Kenyans live below the poverty level and about 17 percent live on less than $1.25 per day.

Looking forward

We will be in Kenya tomorrow afternoon and we expect to see more challenges there. Half of all Kenyans live below the poverty level and about 17 percent live on less than $1.25 per day.

Some of the poverty there is due to disease – malaria, diarrhea, malnutrition, HIV/AIDS and pneumonia take a huge toll and that’s one of the things we’ll be talking to our volunteer coordinators about in Nairobi.

The capital city is home to one of the world’s largest slums but it’s also home to several non-governmental organizations and community centers. The facilities provide medical aid, HIV/AIDS counseling and day-to-day necessities, in addition to education for children.

We’re planning to visit the schools and the homes of the children who attend them before heading to Materi, where Children Incorporated sponsors a boarding school for girls.

I’m not entirely sure what to expect; economically, Kenya is the biggest and most advanced economy in east and central Africa, but the people in the country are very poor and the slums are reportedly some of the worst in the world.

As Luis and I board the plane, he reminds me that we are playing the long game. Life is extremely hard in many of the places we visit, but little by little, hope sets in and a new generation is born. I’m holding on to that.

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HOW DO I SPONSOR A CHILD IN ETHIOPIA?

You can sponsor a child in Ethiopia in one of three ways – call our office and speak with one of our sponsorship specialists at 1-800-538-5381, email us at sponsorship@children-inc.org, or go online to our donation portal, create an account, and search for a child in Ethiopia that is available for sponsorship.

SPONSOR A CHILD