Tag Archives: children in need

All of our sponsors are incredibly important to us and the children they support, and we are delighted every time we receive a letter from one of our volunteer coordinators about how a sponsor went above and beyond to make a difference for children in need.

Today, we hear from Rachel at Broad Rock Elementary School in Virginia, who wrote to one of our sponsors, Sharon, after she donated toys and educational games to the school.

Today, we hear from Rachel at Broad Rock Elementary School in Virginia, who wrote to one of our sponsors, Sharon, after she donated toys and educational games to the school.

Rachel’s Letter 

“Thank you for all of the wonderful donations to our school! I was surprised and so happy to hear from the Director of U.S. Programs at Children Incorporated, Renée, when she contacted me about receiving your thoughtful gifts. Renée even offered to deliver the donations herself, since the Children Incorporated office is located near our school.”

“When Renée arrived, we loaded two small handcarts with the boxes of donations and wheeled them in — and literally as soon as we crossed the threshold, a teacher spied us. She admired the items, and when I explained what they were, she asked excitedly for the three little rubber ducks to use for a special lesson she was planning, and I gave them to her on the spot.”

Putting a smile on Sherry’s face

Renée is pictured with a car full of donations for Broad Rock Elementary School students.

“It was such an incredible surprise to open up each box of items. I selected a few things that we knew your sponsored child, Sherry*, would love, and I surprised her with them the same day. She was over the moon about the Peppa Pig figurines especially. I then let her choose some toys to take home as well. She chose the tea set, puzzles, and a sleeping bag that she’s really excited to use soon when family members visit.”

“After Sherry returned to class, I was able to distribute the rest of the toys to other classrooms. The musical instrument pad went to our music teacher, and the solar robot went to our STEM teacher. A few other items, such as the hand puppets, Legos, and a few board games, I held onto to use for students during individual time or small-groups in our resource center.”

A small act of kindness going a long way

“The rest of the items will be shared with other students in the Children Incorporated program, and what’s left will be made available to parents during parent pick-up at dismissal. Thank you again for your kindness. These items really brighten the lives of children who otherwise don’t have a lot. We appreciate you!

Sincerely,

Rachel”

*Name changed to protect the child.

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How do I sponsor a child in Virginia?

You can sponsor a child in Virginia in one of three ways: call our office at 1-800-538-5381 and speak with one of our staff members; email us at sponsorship@children-inc.org; or go online to our sponsorship portal, create an account, and search for a child in Virginia that is available for sponsorship.

SPONSOR A CHILD

From the snowcapped Himalayans to tropical beaches, India is truly a nation of contrasts. It boasts a rich history spanning tens of thousands of years. In fact, the earliest known civilization in South Asia once called India’s fertile Indus Valley home. Today, with the world’s second-largest population, India includes a staggering variety of ethnicities, languages, religions, and cultures. Its wealth of natural resources and vibrant cultures, however, belie the abject poverty in which so many of India’s citizens live.

Thanks to caring people like you, Children Incorporated has helped thousands of impoverished children in India, offering them a chance at a better and brighter future.

According to the World Bank, even though India has made remarkable strides at reducing poverty over the years, today, 22% of the population, or 270 million people live below the poverty line. 

Challenges for Children in India

In India, children’s very lives and futures are at risk, as they struggle with poverty, and lack of educational resources. Right now, Children in India need your help.

  • 30% of the world’s extremely poor children live in India
  • Each year, 1.4 million children in India die before their 5th birthday
  • Nearly 25% of children have no access to education
  • 4% of children are stunted and suffering from malnutrition
  • Child labor persists within the country, keeping school-age children from going to school
  • Children from rural areas, urbans slums, scheduled castes, and tribal communities often suffer
    from malnutrition, access to quality health services, child marriage, lack of sanitation
    facilities, hygiene, and access to improved water
  • India is highly prone to flooding, droughts, earthquakes and refugee flows that
    impact children’s lives and ability to access basic resources 


Our Work in India

Thanks to caring people like you, Children Incorporated has helped thousands of impoverished children in India, offering them a chance at a better and brighter future.

We work with our volunteer coordinators in local communities to provide health and nutrition, education, hygiene items, clothes, shoes, and other basic needs that help children and families rise above the poverty in which they live.

Our strategy is to focus on individual children through our sponsorship program, ensuring they are receiving exactly what they need on a regular basis.

Your support makes all our work possible for India’s children in crisis.

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How do I sponsor a child in India?

You can sponsor a child in India in one of three ways: call our office at 1-800-538-5381 and speak with one of our staff members; email us at sponsorship@children-inc.org; or go online to our sponsorship portal, create an account, and search for a child in India that is available for sponsorship.

SPONSOR A CHILD

 

SOURCES:

https://www.worldbank.org/en/search?q=india+poverty&currenttab=4&currentTab=1

https://www.thehindubusinessline.com/news/national/in-child-poverty-india-next-only-to-sub-saharan-africa-report/article26196097.ece

https://www.unicef.org/india/children-in-india

https://www.soschildrensvillages.ca/news/poverty-in-india-602

As we begin to receive updates from our affiliated sites in Eastern Kentucky, we want to share with our sponsors and donors how clean up and recovery efforts are coming along in areas in which our sponsored children and their families have been greatly impacted.

At Letcher County and Jenkins Independent Schools, the opening for the new school year, which had originally been scheduled for the week of August 8th, has been postponed indefinitely because of the flooding. Superintendents at both school districts said that damage to the schools alone will not determine when school will resume. In addition to damage to buildings and grounds, the districts have students who have lost everything. Staff members have died and have lost homes, and vehicles and many roads are still impassable.

Thanks to our entire Children Incorporated family for everything you have done to help our families in Eastern Kentucky!

Letcher County Public Schools took damage to six facilities, including the central office, the old vocational school, West Whitesburg Elementary, Whitesburg Middle School, Martha Jane Potter Elementary, and the Fleming-Neon gymnasium.

The Letcher County Public School officials have still not been able to reach many staff members, students and families because of damage to cell phone towers, landline telephones, Internet services and roads.

In the town of Jenkins, the Superintendent said the middle and high school had mud in the parking lot, but nothing inside. Burdine Elementary lost its playground equipment and fencing, and there is damage to the school buildings due to floodwater.

We are incredibly grateful that in the wake of all this devastation, thanks to our supporters, we have currently sent over $47,000 to our affiliated sites in Eastern Kentucky to help families with clean-up efforts and with basic needs.

At this time, we will do our best to keep our supporters up-to-date with relief efforts as they continue, and with information regarding the re-opening of our affiliated schools in the area.

Thanks to our entire Children Incorporated family for everything you have done to help our families in Eastern Kentucky!

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How do I sponsor a child in Kentucky?

You can sponsor a child in Kentucky in one of three ways: call our office at 1-800-538-5381 and speak with one of our staff members; email us at sponsorship@children-inc.org; or go online to our sponsorship portal, create an account, and search for a child in Kentucky that is available for sponsorship.

SPONSOR A CHILD

Abundant in rivers, lakes, and fertile, tropical farmland, El Salvador’s wealth of natural beauty traverses a vast central plateau bordered by Pacific coastal plains to the south and rugged mountains to the north. For centuries, several Mesoamerican nations called this land home, including the Lenca, Olmec, Maya, and Pipil/Cutcatlec.

High unemployment rates, rising inflation, organized crime, and a soaring birthrate leave many Salvadorans in a desperate state.

However, this smallest and most densely populated Central American nation is particularly susceptible to natural disasters like earthquakes and volcanic eruptions, and it has been plagued by chronic political and economic instability for more than a century. High unemployment rates, rising inflation, organized crime, and a soaring birthrate leave many Salvadorans in a desperate state. El Salvador’s poverty is a problem that prevents many from getting a proper education, adequate healthcare, drinkable water, and sanitation services. It also affects children’s growth.

Challenges for Children in El Salvador

In El Salvador, children’s very lives and futures are at risk, as they struggle with poverty and lack of educational resources. Right now, children in El Salvador need your help.

  • 25% of children under the age of 5 live in extreme poverty
  • 36% of the rural population lives in poverty
  • Half of all the country’s children and teenagers live on less than US $1.25 per day
  • Almost 25% of school-aged children do not attend school, and roughly 10% work as child laborers
  • Almost 20% of males and 25 % of females aged 15 or above cannot read or write
  • El Salvador has one of the highest rates of crime and murder in the world, and gang violence and extortion disturb the economy, leading to widespread poverty


Our Work in El Salvador

Thanks to caring people like you, Children Incorporated has helped thousands of impoverished children in El Salvador since 1964.

We work with our volunteer coordinators in local communities to provide health and nutrition, education, hygiene items, clothes, shoes, and other essentials that help children and families rise above the poverty in which they live.

Our strategy is to focus on individual children through our sponsorship program, ensuring they are receiving exactly what they need on a regular basis.

Your support makes all our work possible to help children in crisis in El Salvador.

***

How do I sponsor a child in El Salvador?

You can sponsor a child in El Salvador in one of three ways: call our office at 1-800-538-5381 and speak with one of our staff members; email us at sponsorship@children-inc.org; or go online to our sponsorship portal, create an account, and search for a child in El Salvador that is available for sponsorship.

SPONSOR A CHILD

Sources:

https://databank.worldbank.org/data/download/poverty/987B9C90-CB9F-4D93-AE8C-750588BF00QA/AM2020/Global_POVEQ_SLV.pdf

https://www.statista.com/statistics/790764/poverty-rate-el-salvador/

After a little more than a week in Mexico, the time has come for Luis and I to visit our last affiliated site before returning home to the United States.

Hogar Santa Maria is located just across the river from the city center of Guadalajara where you will find high rise hotels and a bustling main street. The contrast is stark as we drive from our hotel to the neighborhood where Santa Maria is located — it is completely different from one side of the city to the other. Wealth and commerce are contrasted with poverty and old, small buildings. One side is modern and striving, growing towards the future, while the other seems to not be a part of the same world.

It is so apparent that these children feel loved and safe at Santa Maria.

The same but different

These were all the same feelings I had the first time I visited Santa Maria in 2016, but I doubted that everything had stayed exactly the same due to the pandemic. If Santa Maria was anything like all our other affiliated sites in Mexico, our coordinators also had to go through big changes to continue to provide for the children in our program.

When we arrived at the Home, we were greeted by one of the four sisters who takes care of the children, and Santa Maria’s full-time social worker. Unfortunately, our coordinator was away in Mexico City having surgery and couldn’t be with us for our visit, but we were made to feel welcome all the same, given a tour of the facility, and heard about how our sponsorship program has been going over the past few years.

The social worker explained that they were able to continue to provide support for the children during quarantine when the children were sent home, largely thanks to our sponsors. The children only returned just a few short months ago when public schools finally opened again, and now 18 children are living at Santa Maria again during the weekdays. Since before the pandemic, attendance has gone down, and although the home isn’t at full capacity again, almost all of the children who attend have sponsors through Children Incorporated.

As we wandered through the dormitories and the small classrooms, we talked also about the ways in which Santa Maria is a blessing for families in the community. With many parents working long hours or overnight shifts, it is crucial for young children to have a place to live, learn and play with their friends during the week.

With many parents working long hours or overnight shifts, it is crucial for young children to have a place to live, learn and play with their friends during the week.

The parents pay a very small fee for the children to stay at the Home, which as it was explained to us, was mostly just to ensure they felt invested in their child’s care, and less about what the money really provided. Fortunately for these children, their sponsors help make sure they have healthy meals every day, new clothes and shoes, and school supplies throughout the year.

As we finish up our tour, the children arrive excited and, unknowingly to us, expecting our visit. As we gather in the dining room, the children have a surprise for Luis and me — they have learned a song to sing to us to say thanks to our organization and all of our sponsors.

It is so apparent that these children feel loved and safe at Santa Maria, which is important to giving their parents peace of mind while they work. For these children, Santa Maria ensures they and their parents have nothing to worry about while they are there so they can focus on enjoying just being kids.

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How do I sponsor a child in Mexico?

You can sponsor a child in Mexico in one of three ways: call our office at 1-800-538-5381 and speak with one of our staff members; email us at sponsorship@children-inc.org; or go online to our sponsorship portal, create an account, and search for a child in Mexico that is available for sponsorship.

SPONSOR A CHILD

Only four days into our trip to Mexico, our Director of International Programs, Luis Bourdet, and myself are already in our third city, Guadalajara. 

After visiting our affiliated sites in both Mexico City and San Miguel de Allende, I am excited to also return to the La Luz Home in Guadalajara after six years. I have fond memories of meeting the children and getting to hear about this truly incredible site and the abundance of programs that it has for children in the community, including our sponsorship program. 

I have fond memories of meeting the children and getting to hear about this truly incredible site.

Difficulty Through the Pandemic

Our volunteer coordinator, Sister Elizabeth, picks us up early in the morning along with La Luz’s driver, who spends most of his day taking the children back and forth between the Home and the local public schools that they attend. When Luis and I get in the van, there is a young boy sitting next to Sister Elizabeth that at first, I don’t recognize with his mask on.

As we drive to La Luz through the early morning traffic of Guadalajara, Luis and I catch up with Sister Elizabeth about how things have been for her during the pandemic. She admits that, like many other of our affiliated sites, it was difficult for them not knowing when the children would be able to go back to school and knowing that all the families that they support were in need of more resources than ever before.

Remember Fernando

About 20 minutes later, the driver pulls over in a residential neighborhood, and we all exit the car — including the young boy, who removes his mask and takes off running down the sidewalk to a big metal door about 30 feet away. I suddenly realize — I have been here before! We are at the home of Fernando whose family we met on our last trip to Mexico. I hadn’t recognized him, but without his mask, I can see clearly that it is the same Fernando, only taller.

We enter his home, which is occupied only by his older sister at the time — his mother is at work and his other siblings are at school. Fernando is the only child in the family young enough to still be attending La Luz — he is still too small at 10 years old to not have more supervision since his mother works long hours at a local school.

Because of his mother’s demanding work schedule, I know it’s best that Fernando is still at the La Luz Home — as long as he is there, he will be under the loving care of the Sisters and his sponsor — and it’s obvious that it has helped him a lot. He looks healthy and happy, and excitedly gives us a short tour of his small house, even though not much has changed since our last visit.

Big Help From Sponsors

Fernando is pictured in his school uniform standing on the patio of the home he shares with his mother, siblings, grandfather and aunt.

Once we have finished seeing Fernando’s home again, we say goodbye to his sister and head to the La Luz Home, only a short five-minute drive away. The children are still in school, so Sister Elizabeth gives us a tour, and we have a meeting in her office with the Home’s full-time social worker. They tell us that all twenty children at the Home are currently sponsored through the Children Incorporated program, and it’s a big help for them to have the support.

Every child at the La Luz Home, including Fernando, is there because one or both of their parents are incarcerated, so having a sponsor doesn’t just mean they are getting resources they need each month, like food and school supplies, but it means they have someone that they know cares about their well-being.

Like Fernando, some of these children have the same sponsor that they did six years ago when I first came to La Luz, and that can be life-changing for these children, who might not always feel special growing up in poverty with parents who struggle in really desperate situations.

Around the time that we wrap up our meeting, La Luz’s driver is bringing the second group of children to the Home in the van, and both the girls and boys excitedly run from the entrance through the courtyard and into their separate dorms to change out of their school uniforms and get ready for lunch. Sister Elizabeth invites us to chat with the children while they eat, and I have the chance to take some photos of them enjoying their soup and tuna salad, giddy knowing that the guests for the day came to visit with them.

I love knowing that, like Fernando, these other children who I am only just meeting for the first time are getting the chance to live long-term at La Luz as well.

Saying Goodbye for Now

I love knowing that, like Fernando, these other children who I am only just meeting for the first time are getting the chance to live long-term at La Luz as well. It’s a great relief to know that they have some consistency here that doesn’t always exist in their home lives.

As we depart for the day and say our goodbyes, I give one last wave to Fernando and the other children, myself just as giddy as the children knowing how much our sponsors are doing to help ensure that they all get to grow up at La Luz.

***

How do I sponsor a child in Mexico?

You can sponsor a child in Mexico in one of three ways: call our office at 1-800-538-5381 and speak with one of our staff members; email us at sponsorship@children-inc.org; or go online to our sponsorship portal, create an account, and search for a child in Mexico that is available for sponsorship.

SPONSOR A CHILD