Our Affiliated Project: Greyhills Academy High School in Coconino County, Arizona

 

facts about Greyhills Academy High School:

  • Grades served: Ninth – twelfth
  • Average enrollment: 500 students
  • Curriculum: The curriculum adheres to the same standards as Arizona state public schools. In addition to core academic subjects, Navajo history, culture, and language are also taught.
  • Percentage of students on the Federal Free/Reduced-Price Meal program: 100%
  • Meals: Breakfast and lunch are served daily. The school is assisted by a full-time dietician.
  • Faculty: Sixty classroom teachers are employed. Some faculty members hold advanced degrees.
  • Nutrition: A nutritious breakfast and lunch are served daily. One hundred percent of enrolled students qualify for the Free Federal/Reduced-Price Meal program.
  • Medical Care: There is a school nurse on staff to assist with students’ medical needs.
  • Special education: The school provides services for students with disabilities and special needs.
  • Tutoring services: Services are available daily from 4:00 – 7:00 pm. There is no fee required for this service.
  • Academic calendar: The school year typically begins in early August and ends in mid-May. Regular national holidays are observed.

The remote community of Tuba City – home to Greyhills Academy High School – is situated amid the incredible desert beauty of north-eastern Arizona on the Navajo Indian Reservation, less than forty miles from the Grand Canyon. The Reservation comprises more than 27,000 square miles of spectacular but inhospitable countryside, extending into both Utah and New Mexico. Despite its massive scale and rich cultural heritage, residents of the Reservation are desperately poor. There is virtually no employment. Broken homes, alcoholism, and inadequate food are constant manifestations of poverty.

For this reason, Greyhills Academy High School serves as a beacon of hope to its surrounding community, providing children here with a quality education – the key to breaking the cycle of poverty so that students may rise above the difficult economic circumstances from which they come.