Busan is South Korea’s second most-populous city after Seoul, with a population of over 3.5 million. It is also the home to three of our affiliated projects: the Grace Children’s Home, the Hee Rak Children’s Home and the Sae Dul Children’s Home.

While visiting the homes, our Director of International Programs, Luis Bourdet, got a chance to find out how each of the homes stands out in a unique way, while equally supporting our sponsored and unsponsored children with basic needs, a safe home environment and a quality education.

Building children’s self-esteem

During his first visit, Luis found that at the Grace Children’s Home, children are looked after by nineteen staff members, most of whom are social workers.

Without sponsorship support, Luis elaborated, the home would not be able to afford nice garments for the children because they are expensive in Korea — especially in a big city like Busan.

“I was pleased to find that the local government pays the salaries of the large staff, ensuring that the children living at Grace are getting the best care possible,” said Luis.

While on a tour of the home, administrators told Luis that it is their goal to provide the children with the best clothes and shoes possible, in addition to making sure they are fed nutritious food.

“The director of the school feels strongly that providing the children with high-quality items helps increase their self-esteem,” stated Luis.

Without sponsorship support, Luis elaborated, the home would not be able to afford nice garments for the children because they are expensive in Korea — especially in a big city like Busan.

Supporting kids beyond basic needs

At Hee Rak Children’s Home, located on the outskirts of Busan, Luis found that the thirty-six children who are living in the home are not only receiving a well-rounded education but are also provided with after-school tutoring and psychological support.


“Most of the children in the home do not have families and have faced a lot of trauma in their lives as young people. They need support to cope with their individual situations,” explained Luis.

“They live at the Hee Rak Children’s Home all year long and need help on a regular basis, whether with homework in the afternoons or support from a therapist.”

Support from Children Incorporated sponsors is used to augment the home’s food supply as well as to buy clothes and shoes and to cover any small educational needs that government funding does not provide.

Before Luis completed his visit, he had a chance to see the home’s improvements and updates to some of the older buildings. The entire compound had a new sprinkler system installed as well as new windows and doors. Luis was both impressed and pleased with how nice the home was for the more than thirty children who live there full-time.

“The director of the school feels strongly that providing the children with high-quality items helps increase their self-esteem,” stated Luis.

A large home with many students

The Sae Dul Children’s Home itself has a large infrastructure, with the capacity to house 96 children. At the time of Luis’ visit there were 75 children in the home.

“This home is impeccable. The city provides a great deal of support, and it is one of the nicest homes that I have seen in South Korea,” said Luis.

“The children have all they need here — really nice housing, food, educational support and clothes. As is customary in South Korea, all the children sleep on mattresses on the floors which are heated for their comfort.”

Upon leaving Busan, Luis reflected on how grateful he was that these homes were able to support children in our program in such a consistent way.

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How do I sponsor a child in South Korea?

You can sponsor a child in South Korea in one of three ways: call our office at 1-800-538-5381 and speak with one of our staff members; email us at sponsorship@children-inc.org; or go online to our sponsorship portal, create an account, and search for a child in South Korea that is available for sponsorship.